Cloud Tech, Docusign, Salesforce, Technology

Salesforce1 Boost

Salesforce saw a major increase in adoption for its Salesforce1 platform for social, mobile and cloud applications. Pushing its new concept called “The Internet of Customers”, Salesforce is referring to the infrastructure that will connect its marketing cloud applications and databases.

In its first month, the Salesforce1 Customer Platform drove a 96 percent increase in Salesforce1 mobile app active users and a 46 percent increase in active users of custom mobile apps. The company predicts somewhat of a tech revolution, where companies will connect every employee, partner, product, app and device to their customers using the power of social networks, mobile devices, and cloud computing.

The company reports that partner apps built and optimized for the Salesforce1 Customer Platform have already doubled since its launch. More than 250 partners have committed to delivering new Salesforce1 apps on the Salesforce1 AppExchange.

“Salesforce’s strategy is for Salesforce1 to fuel ‘a golden age in enterprise apps’ by acting as a platform upon which both enterprise customers and independent software vendors (ISVs) can develop and run new apps that are fully integrated into the Salesforce user experience,” said Dr. Steve Hodgkinson, Research Director IT, Ovum

DocuSign, an electronic signature transaction platform is part of an integration with Salesforce. “DocuSign for Salesforce1 creates new opportunities for DocuSign customers to extend the value of Salesforce by delivering apps and data Relevant Products/Services in a single place where everything is connected in the context of the customer,” said Keith Krach, chairman and CEO of DocuSign. “As the global standard for eSignature, DocuSign for Salesforce1 brings our powerful and easy-to-use eSignature solution to more customers globally so they can close deals faster in the cloud and in person from the convenience of their mobile device.”

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Cloud Tech, Docusign, Internet, Marissa Meyer, Salesforce, Yahoo

2014 – The Year Mobile Won

In an appearance on Bloomberg TV, Google CEO Eric Schmidt outlined his thoughts on 2014, general tech trends and Google’s biggest mistake that it plans to correct in 2014. Among other topics, a major sticking point was that if 2013 was to be the year of the mobile, then 2014 will be the year that mobile has won.

Mobile has been on a sharp rise for the last few years, and in 2012 many predicted that 2013 would show the best has mobile has to offer but other tech giants seem to agree that the best is yet to come.

Cloud giant Salesforce.com and CEO Marc Benioff dedicated their famed cloud convention Dreamforce to highlight the release of Salesforce1, a condensation of their business suite onto mobile. Benioff and Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer continued to have a keynote on how going mobile-first was the way of the future.

In a lot of ways Salesforce is cloud, with no other true competitor in sight and cloud has always been about digitizing technological function to make it more fluid. Taking cloud services to mobile seems to be a logical extension of that.

Many important cloud based companies have either already endorsed Salesforce1 by supplying apps for the platform, made their own mobile improvement efforts or both in the case of companies like Docusign (whose CEO Keith Krach already collaborates with Salesforce) and their recent announcement of their 2014 Winter release and a focus on improving the mobile experience.

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Business, Cloud Tech, Communications Tech, Docusign, Social Media

Momentum 2014 Conference Signups Are Open

It seems that tech conferences give their attendees just enough time to recover before announcing a new get-together in San Francisco. Hot on the heels of Dreamforce 2013 last month, Docusign has announced their annual tech conference Momentum 2014 and signups are already available online.

The official website claims it will be “3 days of unparalleled networking and discovery” and it should live up to that statement if Momentum 2013 is any indication. Last year’s event gave Docusign a chance to showcase major advances in e-signature and cloud and the permeation of e-signature into almost every major industry. This year’s emphasis is on becoming 100% digital, and attendance promises “actionable strategies to cut costs, conserve resources and make your company truly unstoppable.”

Like any good technology conference, Momentum 2014 hosts numerous tech celebrity speakers. Docusign executives Keith Krach (CEO), Tom Gonser (CSO) and Roger Erickson (VP of Customer Success) will all have speaking events. The two guest stars this year are John Hinshaw (VP of Technology and Operations) from HP and Zach Nelson (CEO) from cloud software company Netsuite.

Momentum 2014 has two events March 4-6 event running in Docusign’s home in San Francisco and a London conference taking place on June 4. Early bird passes are currently selling for $795 (compared to a normal price of $995) with a 3-for-2 bundle going for $1,990 and an 8-for-5 at $4,975. Docusign has always had a strong tradition of content marketing, and the Momentum announcement combined with their recent 2014 Winter Release indicates a major effort to catch the tech community’s attention before the year closes out.

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Business, Communications Tech, Social Media, Startup Highlights

Startup Highlights: Seth Bannon And Amicus

Tech startups that intend to streamline business activities tend to hog the spotlight, but ultimately use of technology is about closing the distance between a consumer and a provider and that’s the mission of Seth Bannon and his company Amicus. Amicus has the ambitious goal of overhauling the way non-profit organizations connect with their donors and supporters, making it easier for all parties involved.

Amicus’s most recent funding run was completed in 2012, but Inc.com recently released an article on Amicus detailing Bannon’s rise from rags to (relative) riches. A dramatic conclusion to the funding round in October 2012 came in the middle of Hurricane Sandy, when the storm knocked out the power in Brad Gillespie’s neighborhood. Gillespie was a partner at IA Ventures poised to sign $3.2 million in Bannon’s direction but delayed by the storm. Luckily, technology was able to save the day. “I downloaded the papers Seth sent and used DocuSign to sign it while on the bridge,” Gillespie says, “surrounded by all these people hanging out and drinking.”

Amicus offers non-profits looking to raise funds and awareness a modern alternative to cold-calling and passing out flyers. Harnessing the reach of social media, Amicus operates on the knowledge that requests for money or favors are going to hit a lot harder coming from friends and family than a stranger. Amicus social network connections are cross referenced with target outreach populations, then those connections are tasked with contacting any of their friends that might be interested in the outreach. Successful contact rewards the caller with points and prizes. It is a surprisingly old school outreach strategy given the tech nature of the company.

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Cloud Tech, Internet, Technology

Salesforce Announces New App Salesforce1 At Dreamforce 2013

If Dreamforce 2013 drilled anything into your head, it should be that Salesforce.com believes mobile is the future. The theme started with Marc Benioff’s key note and culminated in the announcement of the cleverly named Salesforce1, a mobile app that attempts to bring all of Salesforce.com’s mobile products under one roof. There is so speculation on what exactly Salesforce1 will offer but what does seem clear is that a priority is to offer a single platform with unmatched customization for both business owners who use the technology and developers who want to create apps for it.

Salesforce1 has taken an API-first approach that allows developers a lot more control over how they take advantage of the app. An app market called AppExchange has also been retooled on the Salesforce website, allowing developers to put their apps up for consumption.

Big cloud companies have already jumped on board and uploaded apps that are already available for Salesforce1 or will be very soon. Docusign CEO discussed the integration with Salesforce last month, and their app on AppExchange already has plenty of positive outlooks. Though not crowd favorites yet, other big companies like LinkedIn and Dropbox that have had past integration with Salesforce also have apps already presented.

Salesforce1 clearly has plenty of backing, and is continuing to ride the building wave of industry hype. That said Salesforce1 at its core is a refinement of existing products, not the creation of a new one. It’s hard to say whether or not it will have a significant impact but by making it the focus of Dreamforce 2013, Salesforce has certainly made sure that all eyes are on cloud mobile for a little while.

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Cloud Tech, Technology

5 Tip To Stay Afloat At Dreamforce 2013

Dreamforce 2013 officially kicked off yesterday, and if you’re a first time attendee odds are you’re still reeling from the 130,000 strong crowd trying to pack into the Moscone venue built for 60,000 people. Major keynote speakers include Salesforce leader Marc Benioff and Yahoo CEO Marissa Meyer, who is making headlines with her rejection of the NSA.
The rising popularity of cloud computing has turned Dreamforce into one of San Francisco’s biggest annual business conventions, from humble beginnings in 2003 with a turn-out of 1300 people up to 92,300 attendees counted last year.
It has become the business event for cloud computing as a networking opportunity, speaking forum for tech celebrities and a place to enjoy yourself as you absorb the best that the business has to offer. If you happen to be an attendee of Dreamforce (or any major convention really), Mat Rider with Dreamforce veterans Docusign, founded by Keith Krach, has a few tips to help you stay on your feet.
1) Be prepared, practical and patient
This is the basic stuff. There’s a lot of area to cover, so make sure you have a schedule you can keep to and follow it so you don’t hang your colleagues out to dry. Anticipate that you’re going to be walking everywhere due to massive congestion and dress accordingly by wearing comfortable, light clothes you can stay in all day. Leave the heavy gear behind and stick with a smartphone or tablet. Be prepared for crowds!

2) Find your niche
This ties into planning out your time. Dreamforce is huge, and events and speeches are going to be directed at audiences that want to see and hear them. If you’re a developer, you might not want to spend an hour listening to a talk on marketing strategies (though if you do, kudos).

3)Build relationships
One of the main reasons to go to Dreamforce is for the networking. Take the time to get to know people in your field and pass out those business cards. Build a rapport that will last after the convention is over, and you might end up with a positive friendship, business relationship or both.

4) Have fun (but not too much fun)
One of the other main reasons to go is to attend one of the dozens of official and unofficial parties. Go fit in as much fun as you can, but don’t forget that it’s still a business conference and your coworkers are probably with you. Know when you shouldn’t have that last drink. There’s an app available that does the leg work for you called Partyforce.

5) Be an advocate for your favorite apps and companies
Companies have vendors at Dreamforce to market their product and make connections with their fans. If there’s a company you’d like to show support for, go to their booth and ask to become and advocate. You can support the companies you want to succeed will likely end up with some convention swag for your efforts.

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Uncategorized

How Our Files Are Safer And Stronger Than Ever

Cloud software often makes headlines as a means to optimize business and convenience, and it is still a long ways off from becoming as mainstream in our lives as say, cell phones and USB ports but having access to your data anywhere isn’t just about convenience, it’s also about disaster-proofing. Not everyone understands the mechanics of cloud software, but they do come to understand that backups of your files are stored somewhere safe and can be made to appear out of thin air. Smart use of these programs means that the age of losing documents to hardware failure is almost over.

Software like Dropbox allows files to transcend the physical frailties of paper and ink. Not just in the sense that paper can be ripped or damaged, but that these documents can actually be made to exist in multiple places at once via the cloud. It is a level of data security that is unprecedented for the average consumer until recent times. It has gone even farther beyond just safely keeping information though. Functional use of electronic documents has been around since the first email attachment, and only continues to improve as electronic devices become more and more portable. Keith Krach’s Docusign has not only digitized important forms but their function as well; you can send legally binding signatures electronically and securely. It’s a seemingly mundane step up, but the translation of physical action to digital transmission with no real downside is probably the biggest step towards the future of business interaction. And consumers seem to agree, with Dropbox reporting 100 million users in 2012 and Docusign reporting 13 million and growing around the same time.

This becomes particularly relevant when you consider the recent surge of natural disasters. When Hurricane Sandy hit the east coast, many companies found out the hard way that data centers are just as susceptible to flooding and power outage as any other building. Entire data storages that only had backups in Sandy’s path were lost. The flip side of this is that those who took advantage of the clouds ability to easily allow data redundancy survived unscathed, and events like Sandy are highlighting the needs to keep data secure from all threats, including Mother Nature.

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